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Fire and the Carbon Cycle

November 18, 2021, 12PM Eastern

This panel discussion explored the dynamic role that fire plays in soil nutrient cycling, carbon dynamics, and other ecosystem processes. A recording will be available soon. 
 
This discussion was approved for  1.5 Category 1 CFE's by the Society of American Foresters.

Our panel

Nick Skowronski

Nick Skowronski

Nick has been a Research Forester with the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station since 2007. He has also served as the prescribed burn coordinator at Ft. Dix, NJ and as a research technician for the NRS. Nick’s research is focused on the impacts that land management activities have on fuel loading, carbon cycling, and habitat quality. He is particularly interested in estimating canopy fuels in three-dimensional space and integrating research with the needs in the field.

Ken Clark

Ken Clark

Ken is a research forester with the USFS Northern Research Station, stationed at the Silas Little Experimental Forest in the Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey. He has extensive experience with carbon flux and biometric measurements in forests, documenting fire, and insect and harvesting effects on forest carbon dynamics.

Adam Coates

Adam Coates

Adam is the Assistant Professor of Forest Fire Ecology and Management in the Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA. Adam’s research is broadly focused on fuels management, fire effects, and silviculture in the eastern United States.

Louise Loudermilk

Louise Loudermilk

Louise is a Research Ecologist and Fire Team Leader within the USFS Athens Prescribed Fire Laboratory. Louise's research aims to identify and model important processes of vegetation, carbon, and fire dynamics and how that relates to long-term management. She also works to link fire behavior and fire effects using 3D modeling.

Meghan Midgley

Meghan Midgley

Meghan is the Soil Ecologist at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IL. She studies how interactions among plants, microbes, and soil mediate ecosystem responses to environmental perturbations, including prescribed fire. She seeks to use a mechanistic understanding of soil biology to design and enhance effective ecosystem management strategies.

Jessica Miesel

Jessica Miesel

Jessica is an Associate Professor in the Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences at Michigan State University. Her research seeks to improve knowledge about how fire and burn severity influence the aboveground and belowground components of forest ecosystems, focusing on soil physical, chemical, and biological characteristics that influence carbon and nitrogen cycling.

Moderator