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Smoke is NOT Just Smoke

January 20, 2022, 12PM Eastern

Smoke has always been an important issue in wildland fire, but recent fire seasons have driven home the point even more across the eastern US.  Whether it’s the western US and Canadian wildfire smoke or smoke from a local controlled burn, what are the messages we should be communicating?  What are the tools that can help us assess impacts?  Attend this session to hear about the latest in smoke science and management.
 
This discussion has been approved for 1.5 Category 1 CFE's by the Society of American Foresters.

Our panel

Jack McGowan-Stinski

Jack McGowan-Stinski

Jack is the Program Manager for the Lake States Fire Science Consortium funded by the Joint Fire Science Program and administered through The Ohio State University. Jack recevied a B.S. in Wildlife Biology from UW-Stevens Point, and a M.S. in Conservation Biology from Central Michigan University. Jack's other professional experiences include Fire Manager and Land Steward for The Nature Conservancy, Consultant/ Contractor Burn Boss, and multiple seasonal positions with USFS and State DNR's.

Jay Charney

Jay Charney

Jay is a Research Meteorologist with the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station based in Lansing, MI. Jay’s work focuses on the meteorological features that affect fire behavior and smoke dispersion. He uses physics-based models of weather conditions in tandem with field observations of fire and smoke to help optimize the use and interpretation of current analysis and forecasting tools for informing management decisions, and to help develop new tools for use in the future.

Leda Kobziar

Leda Kobziar

Leda is the Associate Professor of wildland fire science at the University of Idaho and focuses her work on prescribed fire use and the effects of the microbial content transported in wildland fire smoke, or “pyroaerobiology”. Leda has been active in outreach and service positions throughout her career, helping to lead the Southern Fire Exchange from 2009-2016 and as Board member and President (2016-2018) of the Association for Fire Ecology.

Melanie Pitrolo

Melanie Pitrolo

Melanie is the Air Program Manager for the USDA Forest Service, Region 8. She has over twenty years of experience in the air quality field. Her areas of expertise include managing the potential air quality impacts from prescribed fires as well as assessing the effects of industrial air pollution on natural resources, especially from acidic deposition and regional haze.

Trent Wickman

Trent Wickman

Trent grew up in northern Minnesota and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Since 2001 he has worked for the US Forest Service as an Air Resource Specialist, primarily in the states of Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin, assessing the impact of air emissions from industrial sources to forest resources and supporting prescribed burning operations through various smoke management activities.

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