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Fire and Water

December 15, 2022, 11:00AM - 12:30PM Eastern Time

The changing climate is reshaping the balance of fire and water in eastern ecosystems. Drought alters soil structure and stability; combined with intense rainfall, this impacts hydrologic dynamics. This panel will explore the interconnections between fire, nutrient cycling, ecohydrology, and climate change.

We are applying for approval for 1.5 Category 1 CFE
's by the Society of American Foresters.

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Stephanie Laseter

Stephanie Laseter

Steven Brantley

Steven Brantley

Steven moved to southwestern Georgia in 2014 to work at the Jones Center at Ichauway as an Ecohydrologist. His research now centers on longleaf pine ecophysiology, forest water budgets, and the potential benefits of longleaf restoration for improving water supplies and protecting aquatic ecosystems in the southeastern U.S. Steven currently holds adjunct faculty appointments at University of Georgia, Auburn University, and Louisiana State University.

Kathy Hawes

Kathy Hawes

Kathy Hawes is the Coordinator of Southeastern Partnership for Forests & Water and a champion for collaboration. Formerly Executive Director of Tennessee Clean Water Network and Coordinator for Mississippi River Collaborative, she has been a clean water advocate since 2012, with a devotion to bringing together public and private partners to achieve mutual goals for protecting cherished natural resources.

Randy Kolka

Randy Kolka

Following his last position as Assistant Professor of Watershed Management at the University of Kentucky, Randy became a Research Soil Scientist with the USDA Forest Service’s Northern Research Station in Grand Rapids, MN in 2002. He studies the cycling of water, elements, and pollutants in urban, agricultural, forested, and wetland ecosystems across the globe.

James Vose

James Vose

Jim is an Adjunct Professor at North Carolina State University. His career includes 2 decades at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory studying and leading research on watershed ecosystem responses to disturbances and forest management, and he recently retired from his position as a Senior Research Ecologist with the USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station. His current research examines the interactions among climate change, changing forest conditions, and water resources at landscape scales.

Moderator

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